Communities

About Cambridge, Wisconsin Real Estate 
"One of the Best Getaways in the Midwest"

Welcome to Cambridge, Wisconsin!

Cambridge, Wisconsin area examples of 
Real Estate, Realty, Realtor, Reality, Relator, Real Estate Agent, Homes, Homes for sale, Properties, Properties for sale, Condos, Condominiums, New Construction, Farms, Farmettes, Rural Homes, Vacant Land, Luxury Homes, Executives Homes, High End Homes, Estates, Waterfront, Lake Property, Lake Frontage, Recreational, Relocation, MLS, Multiple Listing Service, Prudential, Country Homes, Investment Property, Income Property, Residential Real Estate, Senior, 55 plus Communities, Retired Real Estate, Active Adult Communities, First Time Buyers, Buyers Agent, Buyer Agency, Sellers Agent, Relocation, Moving to, Hunting Land, Recreational Properties, Multifamily, Townhouse, Single Family and MoreLocated in Dane County (with parts inJefferson County), the Village of Cambridge, WIsconsin is conveniently situated 20 miles east of Madison, the state capital, and one hour west of Milwaukee. The population of Cambridge was 1,101 at the 2000 census. At home in beautiful south central Wisconsin, Cambridge is nestled amid small rural towns, historic churches, lake and streams with a pleasant mix of farmers, business people, artists and entrepreneurs; its rural ambiance punctuated by the Koshkonong Creek, which runs through the center of the village, flowing south to Lake Koshkonong.

The surrounding area had been settled by Scottish and Norwegian farmers establishing Cambridge in 1847. But he Cambridge area's first steps toward development began with a dam on Koshkonong Creek. With the dam able to harness the creek's waters, within the first few years saw and grist mills, two general stores, two hotels, a boot and shoe shop, a harness shop, a cabinet shop, a tailor, a milliner store and a saloon all lined Main Street. One of the hotels on Main Street still stands and is currently the home of the jewelry store today.

Nearby Lake Ripley is a spring-fed lake that has long been a lure for city-weary souls. Vacationers started coming to Cambridge and Lake Ripley from Chicago as far back as the late 1800s. The crown jewel is Ripley Park, a quiet, comfortable area of open land nestled on the lake's western shoreline. To promote Cambridge as a tourist attraction, the village adopted the symbol of a blue and yellow umbrella, and dubbed itself the “Umbrella City”. This symbol (based off umbrellas used at the beach on Lake Ripley) is still used by the village in some of its promotions today.

Cambridge came full circle by the turn of the century; a prosperous downtown area filled with quaint shops and restaurants, a beautiful public beach on Lake Ripley, and a wonderful park system. The Cambridge area hosts several annual fund raising events that are open to the public. The Cannonball Run is held on the first Saturday of July and features both a 5 and 10k course.

Today, Cambridge is viewed as a strong artistic community, consisting of a diverse collection of independently owned businesses and services. Here you will find a mingling of both old and new. Inside Victorian storefronts and century-old buildings are a variety of specialty shops featuring antiques, boutiques, art galleries, Amish made furniture, jewelry, salt-glaze and art pottery, home accessories, specialty foods and a coffee shop or two.

A year round community, Cambridge, Wisconsin features festivals and activities for all ages. In the spring and summer, outdoor events like the Renaissance Fair and Pottery Festival & US Pottery Games are a favored spot to commune with neighbors. In fall, the Walk in the Park Antique Show and Folk Craft Fair offer great opportunities for shoppers, and winter is made for the holidays with Cambridge Country Christmas. And all year long, young and old alike can visit the museum named after one of Cambridge's favorite sons, Matt Kenseth, to experience his many NASCAR triumphs for yourself.

The Cambridge area also offers an abundance of options for those searching for recreation and relaxation. Visit Lake Ripley’s clear waters which are ideal for water sports from canoeing to sailing, while both avid and novice fisherman enjoy the tranquility and bounteous catches offered up year-round. Residents regularly enjoy a hike through one of the area’s many parks and nature trails, including the 300 acre Cam-Rock multi-use park and trail system, which offers bicyclists, cross-country skiers and picnic-goers a wonderful place to kick back and experience the outdoors.

Recently voted one of the 100 Best Small Town Getaways in the Midwest (Midwest Living Magazine June 2007), Cambridge's charm and natural beauty makes a perfect community to "get away" right in your own neighborhood. Area Bed & Breakfasts extend that charm with Victorian, Lodge to Cottage style homes made into comfortable accommodations for your privacy getaway or your out-of-town guests..

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Welcome to Johnson Creek, Wisconsin!

Johnson Creek, Wisconsin area examples of 
Real Estate, Realty, Realtor, Reality, Relator, Real Estate Agent, Homes, Homes for sale, Properties, Properties for sale, Condos, Condominiums, New Construction, Farms, Farmettes, Rural Homes, Vacant Land, Luxury Homes, Executives Homes, High End Homes, Estates, Waterfront, Lake Property, Lake Frontage, Recreational, Relocation, MLS, Multiple Listing Service, Prudential, Country Homes, Investment Property, Income Property, Residential Real Estate, Senior, 55 plus Communities, Retired Real Estate, Active Adult Communities, First Time Buyers, Buyers Agent, Buyer Agency, Sellers Agent, Relocation, Moving to, Hunting Land, Recreational Properties, Multifamily, Townhouse, Single Family and MoreThe Village of Johnson Creek in Jefferson County, Wisconsin, is conveniently located halfway between Milwaukee and Madison at the crossroads of I-94 and Hwy 26. The current population of Johnson Creek is 2,012. The picturesque Rock River winds through the village, setting the stage for fishing and boating excursions. A few miles west, nature and history lovers explore the Aztalan State Park and Museum, an archeological site of a 12th-century Indian village.The Village of Johnson Creek in Jefferson County, Wisconsin, is conveniently located halfway between Milwaukee and Madison at the crossroads of I-94 and Hwy 26. The current population of Johnson Creek is 2,012. The picturesque Rock River winds through the village, setting the stage for fishing and boating excursions. A few miles west, nature and history lovers explore the Aztalan State Park and Museum, an archeological site of a 12th-century Indian village.

The Village's park and open space system consists of 37 total acres of parkland and special use areas. When combined with the School District, there are about 50 acres designated for park and open space use. The Village's park system includes a full range of developed facilities including neighborhood parks, community parks and special uses areas located throughout the community. Hiking, biking, water sports and outdoor recreation of all kinds are year-round in Johnson Creek. Just outside of Johnson Creek is the midway point of the popular Glacial Drumlin State Bike Trail. Resident bikers, hikers and snowmobil enthusiasts enjoy the convenience of this 53-mile off-road trail, which begins near Madison and ends in the Fox River Sanctuary in Waukesha. And in the winter, those famous Wisconsin snows leave a fresh, immaculate blanket of white on which residents love to frolic; kids and families, fishermen, snowmobilers, skiers and hunters all delight in the many outdoors activities available in Johnson Creek, Wisconsin.The Village's park and open space system consists of 37 total acres of parkland and special use areas. When combined with the School District, there are about 50 acres designated for park and open space use. The Village's park system includes a full range of developed facilities including neighborhood parks, community parks and special uses areas located throughout the community. Hiking, biking, water sports and outdoor recreation of all kinds are year-round in Johnson Creek. Just outside of Johnson Creek is the midway point of the popular Glacial Drumlin State Bike Trail. Resident bikers, hikers and snowmobil enthusiasts enjoy the convenience of this 53-mile off-road trail, which begins near Madison and ends in the Fox River Sanctuary in Waukesha. And in the winter, those famous Wisconsin snows leave a fresh, immaculate blanket of white on which residents love to frolic; kids and families, fishermen, snowmobilers, skiers and hunters all delight in the many outdoors activities available in Johnson Creek, Wisconsin.

And the indoor sports are just as prevalent in this community. A dazzling array of unique specialty and brand name shops comprise the Johnson Creek Mall which straddles I-94 as it stretches between Madison and Milwaukee. Downtown Johnson Creek also abounds like quaint shops that sparkle during the holiday season and all year 'round.And the indoor sports are just as prevalent in this community. A dazzling array of unique specialty and brand name shops comprise the Johnson Creek Mall which straddles I-94 as it stretches between Madison and Milwaukee. Downtown Johnson Creek also abounds like quaint shops that sparkle during the holiday season and all year 'round.

Known as "The Crossroads With a Future," a name adopted because of Johnson Creek's ideal location at the intersection of Interstate 94 and State Highway 26, Johnson Creek has become home to numerous new residential and commercial developments. Business and economic development is a major focus of village leadership and its locale gives the community an opportunity few can match, as both of its neighboring metro areas expand toward each other.Known as "The Crossroads With a Future," a name adopted because of Johnson Creek's ideal location at the intersection of Interstate 94 and State Highway 26, Johnson Creek has become home to numerous new residential and commercial developments. Business and economic development is a major focus of village leadership and its locale gives the community an opportunity few can match, as both of its neighboring metro areas expand toward each other.

For more information on activities in and around Johnson Creek, Wisconsin, visit:For more information on activities in and around Johnson Creek, Wisconsin, visit:

 

 

About Lake Mills, Wisconsin Real Estate 

A City of Parks and Sparkling Waters

Welcome to Lake Mills, Wisconsin!

Lake Mills, Wisconsin is a city in Jefferson County, in the south-central region of the state, just east of the capital, Madison. The population of Lake Mills in the 2000 census was 4,843. The city is located partially within the Town of Lake Mills. The city, originally called Tyranena from the indigenous name meaning "sparkling waters" is located on Rock Lake and was named for both the lake and its first mill, built by founder Joseph Keyes.

Its said that the legendary Chief Black Hawk came through the area shortly before the Black Hawk War of 1832, the last stand of the Indians in the Northwest Territories. Following the war in 1836, the first white settlers in the area set up camp at the waterfall between the lake and creek. They renamed the lake, Rock Lake. In 1838, ten years before Wisconsin became a state, an official settlement was established with both its own sawmill and gristmill built on the shores of the lake and was given the name, Lake Mills.

East of town lies Aztalan State Park, one of Wisconsin's most significant archeaological sites. Once the northermost outpost of the Middle Mississippian culture, Aztalan was a fortified village whose culture thrived between 1000 and 1300 A.D. But by the time of Columbus, the site had been deserted, leaving only its pyramid-shaped ceremonial mounds. Today, Aztalan is both peaceful - you can climb to the top of a restored diamond-shaped pyramid (a great spot for kite flying) - and active, when motorcross bike events grab the summer spotlight.

Lake Mills has been called a "City of Parks." At one such park north of town, Tryranena Park, you can swim in the spring-fed waters of Rock Lake. The lake hides a local mystery, stories going back to to pioneer days tell of strange stone pyramids beneath its waters. Abundant with a variety of fish, this 1,371 acre lake continues to deserve its reputation as one of the very clearnest lakes in Wisconsin.

Ideally situated in the rolling green Wisconsin hills, Lake Mills residents enjoy many outdoor activities, including nearby access to some of the finest public and private golf courses in the Midwest. Golf course lots are plentiful in the region and provide both a great setting and ready access to one of Wisconsin's favorite summer activities. Nearby biking and hiking trails, rock climbing, swimming and - with Madison and Milwaukee just minutes away, both collegiate and professional spectator sports are also at their best for Lake Mills home owners.

Lake Mills residents love to follow the legends that have helped to define the community. They love to investigate the tales of underground pyraminds, learn about the ancient travelers of Aztalan, and walk in Black Hawk's footsteps as he tries desparately to lead his people to safety as well as ride with the pursuing soldiers determined to protect and preserve settlers from marauders and terror. They love to invigorate themselves with the endlessly active recreational options that belie this quiet and pleasant area. They love also to immerse themselves, frequently, in a round or two (or more) of some of the finest and most affordable golf in the upper midwest on courses splendid in luxurious greens and autumn colors or stroll along the cool Glacial Drumlin trail. The love to rev their engines at the Aztalan Cycle Club races or Jefferson Speedway, and indulge in a bountiful array of restaurants, boutiques and galleries.

Of course, the great thing about is... there's still room for YOU in Lake Mills, Wisconsin!

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About Delafield, Wisconsin Real Estate 

Discover the Grandeur of Small Town Wisconsin

Welcome to Delafield, Wisconsin!

The City of Delafield, located in southeastern Wisconsin (Waukesha County), surrounds Lake Nagawicka. Delafield is strategically situated twenty-five miles west of Milwaukee and fifty miles east of Madison, the state capitol. Unique in its small town atmosphere and quaintness, Delafield, Wisconsin continues to attract families and businesses to its historic and beautiful landscape.

In the early nineteenth century, the area which is now Delafield was dotted with sparkling lakes, clear river streams and hardwood forests. Seasonal fishing and hunting camps of several Indian tribes could be found on the shores of the lakes and streams. Cabins were first settled on this rolling landscape in 1839. Other settlers, including farmers and merchants, soon followed. herds of sheep began to graze the gentle hills as grist and saw mills appeared along the streams.

Perhaps Delafield's most famous settler was Nelson Hawks, who moved here with his family from the state of New York. Mr. Hawks soon built a 3-story inn as a stage coach stop in 1846. Recognized by the National Register of Historic Places, the Hawks Inn still stands today as an educational museum. Mr. Hawks named this little settlement Delafield and in 1848, the territory became the state of Wisconsin. Today this historic community thrives with over six thousand residents.

Historic Delafield established in 1837 offers unique quaintness nestled in the hills of the Kettle Moraine. Delafield is just 30 minutes west of Milwaukee adjacent to 1-94. The community offers historic sights, antique and specialty shopping, award winning restaurants, lodging and a variety of recreational activities year round. Charming Delafield offers two stimulating shopping districts. The Hwy 83 interchange boasts a collection of department stores, a variety of specialty shops, an array of restaurants and friendly accommodations for the overnight visitor. Just as friendly and so inviting, the downtown hosts exceptional crafts-men, antique treasures, mouthwatering eateries and a delightful array of unique shops. The city is host to community celebrations and festivals throughout the year.

Delafield Days, Lake Country Women's Club Art Fair, the Woodcarvers' Show, and a Halloween Celebration at The Steeple in the fall are a few of the many celebrations held annually in this tight-knit community. Neighbors share in the holiday spirit at the annual Christmas Tree lighting Ceremony. Residents and their guests can also visit Hawks Inn, St. John's Northwestern Military Academy and Nashotah House. These historic institutions still carry on their traditions and offer scheduled tours throughout the year.

As a premier boarding school for boy in grades 7-12, nearby St. John's Northwestern Military Academy provides a unique environment defined by four "cornerstones of success: character development, academics, athletics, and leadership." The English Gothic architecture of the buildings, which are surrounded by broad lawns and towering trees, makes the campus one of the most picturesque in the United States. Among the academy's many distinguished alumni are Curtis Roosevelt, grandson of FDR and U.S. delegate to the United Nations, Andrew Filipowski, Founder of Platinum Technologies, the 8th largest software firm in the world, and Martin Torrijos Espino, current president of the Republic of Panama.

The business district of Delafield is established along the south end of Lake Nagawicka and is located off of Interstate 94, with State Hwy. 83 providing easy access to points north and south. Antiquing is a fond hobby for many, given the quaint and quiet setting, and there are several antique shops in downtown Delafield, including the Delafield Antiques Center, The Lang Companies Store and The Steeple. These shops can all be found along Genesee St. (Hwy. C).

Delafield also has many recreational and sporting activities available to everyone. Locals enjoy the bike and hiking trails surrounding the area. For a more restful activity, relax and enjoy a leisurely r

For more information on activities in and around Delafield, Wisconsin, visit:

 

 

About Marshall, Wisconsin Real Estate 
Enjoying Nature at Its Best

Welcome to Marshall, Wisconsin!

The Village of Marshall, Wisconsin, lies within Dane County, east of the City of Sun Prairie along the Maunesha River. The 2000 population of Marshall, WI was 3,432. Via the Crawfish and Rock Rivers, the Maunesha River is part of the Mississippi River watershed. The Maunesha is formed in the town of Bristol in Dane County from a collection of headwaters tributaries flowing from Columbia County. It flows generally westward through northeastern Dane County, northwesternJefferson County (past the city of Waterloo) and southwestern Dodge County where it joins the Crawfish River in the town of Portland, Wisconsin.

In June of 1837, 45 men forged their way from Milwaukee to Madison to begin construction of the new state capitol. Three of these men, Andrew & Zenas Bird and Aaron Petrie, made a mental note of an idyllic location to begin their new homes, but months of labor ended in October of 1838 when an autumn prairie fire destroyed a public building and the beginning of a sawmill. For more than a decade, the present day village was known desparagingly as Bird’s Ruins.

But as the surrounding area grew back and the nearby Watertown/Madison stretch grew in commercial and population travel, the region continued to attract interest from would-be residents yearning for a suitable community to build their homes. Known throughout its history by a variety of long-forgotten names (Bird's Ruins, Medina, Hanchetville, and Howard City), the now thriving Bird's Ruins community was renamed in the mid-1880s by Madison Real Estate Samuel Marshall, who had purchased much of the land in the village from Asahel Anchett.

Today's Marshall, Wisconsin offers an enjoyable small-town atmosphere for both those who seek the rural life as well as those looking to work in - but regularly seek refuge from - the hectic pace of Madison, the state capital charged with a frenetic pace of government, academia and commerce. Nevertheless, along with that pace comes numerous opportunities for entertainment, fun, activities of all kinds, and shopping. Dane County, itself, is widely known for its natural beauty and unique natural features - and Marshall's residents delight in using their home town as a base to meander throughout the county, the Capital region and all of southern Wisconsin to enjoy nature at its best.

For more information on activities in and around Marshall, Wisconsin, visit:

 

 

About Oconomowoc, Wisconsin Real Estate 

Newport of the West

Welcome to Oconomowoc, Wisconsin!

Oconomowoc is a city in Waukesha County, Wisconsin, just west of Milwaukee. The name, Oconomowoc (OE-kahn'-ah-mah-wok"), was derived from "Coo-no-mo-wauk," the native Potawatomie term for distinguishing a waterfall in the vicinity. The city is located partially within the Oconomowoc township. There is also the nearby Village of Oconomowoc, Town of Oconomowoc and Oconomowoc Lake. Oconomowoc's population was 12,382 at the 2000 census.

Although frequented by French fur traders and trappers since the early 1800s, the founding and development of Oconomowoc began in 1837 when the first white man, Charles Sheldon, came to the area to build his home. As word of its beauty and natural wealth spread, more tradesmen began to arrive. One such early settler was a young man by the name of John S. Rockwell. He built the grist mill, owned the first store and hotel, and donated sites to all the churches. He started the fire department, the library, the elementary school and a young ladies convent called Bord du Lac. His stoutheartedness and ingenuity earned him the title "Father of Oconomowoc."

Combining the rapid growth of the town together with its idyllic setting and natural assets, Oconomowoc quickly became a hub for the wealthy families of the Midwestern United States as the ideal summer location for their homes, parties and special events. Large and elaborate mansions graced the lakeshores of the area, as well as luxuriant ancillary buildings and grounds groomed daily to add to their owners' high lifestyles. Fueled by its growing reputation, Oconomowoc entered a new era marked by the title "Newport of the West." This era began in the 1870s and continued into the 1930s. Lured by Oconomowoc's great beauty, families of wealth from Chicago, St. Louis and Milwaukee crowded its lake shores with palatial, colonnaded country mansions and lavish landscapes. At one time, Lake Road was referred to as Presidents' Avenue since Taft, Grant, Cleveland, Coolidge, McKinley and Teddy Roosevelt had visited and enjoyed famous Draper Hall and the hospitality of its wealthy residents.

Today, many of those structures remain, including the only fieldstone train depot remaining in the Midwest. Victorian homes lining shade-filled streets were uncommonly common in the Oconomowoc of the late-19th and early 20th centuries. The summer mansions have become year-round homes and thriving industries help support what was once primarily heralded as a vacation destination. The largely intact, late 19th century downtown and many stately historic houses are reminders of those years. Historic walking tours around Fowler Lake, either guided or self-guided, provide a snapshot of the grandeur of yesterday.

A city for all seasons, Oconomowoc, Wisconsin offers an abundance of activities and events to delight its residents valuable leisure time. Shoppers find Oconomowoc a paradise of goods from the latest in fashion and unusual art, to stained glasses and exquisite jewelry. And the many lakeside homes offer Oconomowoc citizens relaxing days and pleasant evenings. Some things never change.

For more information on activities in and around Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, visit:

 

About Watertown, Wisconsin Real Estate 

Loads of Water Fun

Welcome to Watertown, Wisconsin!

The City of Watertown, WIsconsin straddles both Jefferson and Dodge Counties in southeastern Wisconsin. Most of the city's population is in Jefferson County. Division Street, several blocks north of downtown, is built on the county line. The Rock River flows through Watertown in a horseshoe bend before heading south and west on its way to the Mississippi River. The city originally developed inside the horseshoe, though it has long since grown beyond. Silver Creek adjoins the river in the city, as does a short creek on the west side. The most notable geographical feature is a high density of drumlins, long hills formed by the glaciers of the Wisconsin glaciation as they retreated northwards. As a result, all hills in the area are elongated in the north-south direction. .

Watertown was first settled by Timothy Johnson, who built a cabin on the west side of the river in 1836. A town was settled to utilize the power of the Rock River, which falls 20 feet in two miles. In contrast, the Rock River falls only 34 feet in the 58 miles upstream from Watertown. The waterpower was first used for sawmills, and later prompted the construction of two hydroelectric dams, one downtown (where the river flows south) and one on the eastern edge of the city (where the river flows north). The Watertown economy remains heavily reliant on light industry.

In 1853, a plank road was completed from Milwaukee to Watertown. After plank roads were no longer used, the route was replaced by highway (Wisconsin Highway 16) and railroad. However, a street named "Watertown Plank Road" survives in Milwaukee. The road is referenced by the "Plank Road Brewery" family of beers, including Icehouse beer, produced by Miller Brewing Company in Milwaukee.

Today, Watertown's population is over 23,131 and the city has been home to several famous or influential Americans in the distant, as well as more recent, past. Watertown's favorite sons and daughters include Margarethe Schurz, who founded the first American kindergarten in 1856 (the building that housed this kindergarten is now located on the grounds of the Octagon House Museum in Watertown) and journalist R. D. Blumenfeld, editor of the British Daily Express. Dan Brandenstein, former NASA astronaut and veteran of four space shuttle flights; Joseph E. Davies, the second Ambassador to represent the United States in the Soviet Union; and former Major Leage Baseball first baseman Fred Merkle, who played 16 years in the Major Leagues in the early twentieth century, also hail from Watertown, Wisconsin.

Of course, a name like Watertown may conjur up a myriad of images focused on - what else? - water!. And that is certainly the case here. Throughout the city, it's common to see Watertowners of all ages fishing, swimming, sailing or relaxing on gently floating air tubes of all shapes and sizes. Others might canoe, paddleboat or ski behind a flying motorboat. During those cold Wisconsin winters, water enthusiasts like to take to the ice where boats were floating, racing or sailing just weeks before.

The gently rolling green hills emblematic of the entire State of Wisconsin invite golfers of all levels of expertise. Novices and top amateurs, alike, have their choice between two challenging 18-hole courses in Watertown. Watertown Country Club is a private club located on Silver Creek and includes a dining/banquet facility while Windwood is a public course complete with restaurant and dining/banquet facilities located just east of the city in the rolling hills of the Wisconsin countryside.

Those who come to Watertown sense community spirit all around town. For generations, Watertown residents have tended to the little things that make life great. They planned well for the future - as is evidenced in our commercial, worship and public buildings. As newcomers drive through the community, they notice pride in ownership in Watertowns homeowners, business owners and entrepreneurs. Neighborhood watch groups get to know each other and strive to maintain a peaceful and friendly relationship.

For more information on activities in and around Watertown, Wisconsin, visit:

 

 

 

 

Stephanie Bratz

Stephanie Bratz

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